MEETINGS / EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

Come join us!

Aiken Audubon programs are free and open to the public. They are currently held at Bear Creek Nature Center, located at 245 Bear Creek Road, Colorado Springs, 80906. Coffee, snacks, and socializing begins at 6:30 pm and programs begin at 7 pm.

Aiken’s weather cancellation policy: Sometimes inclement weather may cause us to cancel an Aiken meeting. If this happens, a decision will be made by 1 pm on the meeting date. Notification will be placed here our website, on our Facebook page, and sent out through our email notification list. In addition, a message will be posted on the CoBirds Listserv, which many Aiken birders subscribe to. If there is any doubt, please do not hesitate to contact any Aiken board members via telephone. Always, your safety is first so use your own judgement when coming to a meeting.

Finally, if you have ideas or would like to present a program at one of our meetings, please contact program chair Diane Luck at luckdiane@gmail.com.


May 16  / Clark Jones
One Finch, Two Finch: A short history of counting birds in the United States

Counting birds is an important part of tracking bird populations, but it is more complicated than one might think. Changes in bird populations have often been the first indicators that potentially irreversible damage is being suffered by an ecosystem.This presentation will give an overview of several of the bird-census programs used in North America and what they tell us about how bird populations are changing.

While the Breeding Bird Survey and Christmas Bird Count give us an overview of how some populations of birds may be fluctuating, several other lesser-known monitoring programs provide valuable information on the state of bird populations. We’ll explore what some of the data reveal about bird population trends in Colorado and other regions of United States, and what some of the limitations of our knowledge are.

Bird census techniques and data analysis have undergone dramatic improvements thanks to new analytical methods and better data. Sometimes they lead to controversy. The implications of a population estimate for an endangered species may have large policy consequences. Counting birds is important and having a better understanding of what the numbers mean can help you make important decisions regarding where you align your support for conservation policy.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Advertisements